« Hitler, my neighbor », by the The New Yorker

Hitler, My Neighbor, by Edgar Feuchtwanger with Bertil Scali, translated from the French by Adriana Hunter (Other Press). In this disquieting coming-of-age story, narrated in the voice of the author’s childhood self, Feuchtwanger unfolds the surreal tale of the decade he spent living across the street from Hitler’s Munich apartment, from 1929 to 1939. Born to proudly German secular Jews, he had barely grasped that he was Jewish before he heard that Jews were evil and not really German. He can’t wrap his mind around the contradictions, but neither can many adults. Illuminating how it was possible for so many to be so confused is the book’s great achievement; young Edgar, seeing his famous neighbor frequently around town, can hardly believe that he truly means what he says on the radio.

Newsweek : « L’Allemagne des années 1930 racontée d’une façon inédite »

« Newsweek Magazine » : « Écrit comme un journal, « Hitler, mon voisin » raconte l’Allemagne des années 1930 d’une façon inédite, avec des descriptions d’Hitler dans des situations quasi-privées décrite d’un point de vue particulier. Le récit a le charme du regard d’un enfant et la précision d’un travail d’historien. » Newsweek Magazine  has published the feature of HITLER, MY NEIGHBOR online here. The piece will also appear in the December 15 print issue. It includes a nice quote: “Composed of diaristic vignettes, Hitler, My Neighbor offers a singular portrait of 1930s Germany, unique both for its intimate glimpses of Hitler in semi-private moments and for its point of view. The narrative unfolds from a child’s perspective but benefits from an adult historian’s attention to detail.”

Over 150 guests came to USC to hear Edgar share his memories of growing up as a Jewish boy living in the same street as Adolf Hitler
Hitler, mon voisin , Revue de presse / 19 novembre 2017

On Wednesday 15 of Novembre 2017, USC university presented “Hitler, My Neighbor” authored by eminent historian Edgar Feuchtwanger. The memoir, co-written with French journalist Bertil Scali, gives the account of the Nazi rise to power from Feuchtwanger’s unique perspective as a young boy from a prominent German Jewish family living in Munich with Adolf Hitler as his neighbor for nine years. In this time Germany was transformed into a dictatorship, and in 1939 Feuchtwanger (now 93) fled to England where he would go on to become a respected professor of history. Amazingly, he has said, the Nazis never figured out that prominent novelist Lion Feuchtwanger, despised by Hitler, was his uncle. If they had, he would not have been present to introduce the English edition of his book published this month to the over 150 guests in attendance. The successful event was organized by USC’s Exile Studies Librarian, Michaela Ullmann, and moderated by USC Professor of History, Paul Lerner.

Columbian College of Arts and Sciences : Historian Edgar Feuchtwanger tells his story as a Jewish Boy growing up next to Hitler
Hitler, mon voisin , Revue de presse / 10 novembre 2017

The story is incredible: As a young Jewish boy growing up in Munich, future historian Edgar Feuchtwanger lived across the street from Adolf Hitler. With the release of a new American edition of his memoir about that period, we were pleased to feature an excerpt from the book on TIME History this week. “He looks at me. I should look away,” Feuchtwanger writes. “But I can’t. I stare at him. Maybe I should smile? I’m his neighbor, after all! Does he recognize me? Does he know I watch him from my bedroom? Can he see inside our house? Does he watch us eating in the dining room? Does he know I’m Jewish? I don’t want him to hate me. Or my father. Or my mother. Are people looking at me? He’s climbed into a dark car, black as night, its lines as hard as stone.” *** The following is an excerpt from Hitler, My Neighbor: Memories of a Jewish Childhood, 1929-1939 by Edgar Feuchtwanger with Bertil Scali, translated by Adriana Hunter. In this passage, Feuchtwanger — who grew up Jewish in Munich, across the street from Adolf Hitler’s house — recalls the lead-up to the 1930 elections that saw the…

« Hitler, mon voisin » dans The New York Journal of Books : “An exceptionally powerful and emotionally charged story.”
Hitler, mon voisin , Revue de presse / 8 novembre 2017

New York Journal of Books site today. I particularly love the quote: “Feuchtwanger is an excellent writer. He wisely focuses on the senses, an especially significant technique for authors of childhood experiences. He sees the world through the eyes of a child, yet delivers from the aspect of an adult trained in writing history. The result is an exceptionally powerful and emotionally charged story.” You can find the link here. “An exceptionally powerful and emotionally charged story.” “You can’t walk along the sidewalk in front of Hitler’s house now because there are barriers—and behind them soldiers standing to attention, watching the Mercedes cars in the street. I recognize the guards because I pass them every day, but they don’t notice me, an invisible little Jewish boy. I have been walking past this building all my life and I watch them closely. I imagine what it must be like being Hitler. I wonder what he eats for breakfast. I see his shadow pass behind a window frame. He hates us. He hates me. Without even knowing I exist.” In 1924, Edgar Feuchtwanger was born to Jewish parents in Munich, Germany. During his first five years, Edgar plays with toys, listens to…

« Hitler, mon voisin », sur People.com
Hitler, mon voisin , Revue de presse / 8 novembre 2017

Growing Up Jewish on Hitler’s Block: ‘Our Neighbor’s a Dangerous Man’ The following is an excerpt from Hitler, My Neighbor: Memories of a Jewish Childhood, 1929-1939 by Edgar Feuchtwanger with Bertil Scali, translated by Adriana Hunter. In this passage, Feuchtwanger — who grew up Jewish in Munich, across the street from Adolf Hitler’s house — recalls the lead-up to the 1930 elections that saw the Nazi party gain a serious foothold in the Reichstag:

« Hitler, mon voisin », dans Time Magazine
Hitler, mon voisin , Revue de presse / 8 novembre 2017

Growing Up Jewish on Hitler’s Block: ‘Our Neighbor’s a Dangerous Man’ By Edgar Feuchtwanger and Bertil Scali November 7, 2017 The following is an excerpt from Hitler, My Neighbor: Memories of a Jewish Childhood, 1929-1939 by Edgar Feuchtwanger with Bertil Scali, translated by Adriana Hunter. In this passage, Feuchtwanger — who grew up Jewish in Munich, across the street from Adolf Hitler’s house — recalls the lead-up to the 1930 elections that saw the Nazi party gain a serious foothold in the Reichstag: Retrouver l’article sur Time.com